Haute Edit Logo Black

Style Uncovered

If you value the rarity, authenticity, tradition and heritage of artisanal slow design, then Haute Edit is the perfect complement to all your style needs.

Newsletter



Follow Haute Edit

Search

Haute Edit Ceramics Created With Love

4 Fine Dining Faux Pas that You are Committing

A well prepared, beautifully presented meal adds to the experience of a glamorous night out.

The tinkling glasses, the stimulating conversation and the symphony of tantalizing tastes on the palate make for memorable moments.

But if you aren’t careful, fine dining can end up being a sticky course to navigate (pun fully intended).

Here are four faux pas that we regularly commit but have never spared much thought to.

The Mobile Mistake

It is rather innocuous. Smart devices are like an extension of our being. So having them cosy up against the flatware or the silverware isn’t really a gaffe, right? Turns out a mobile phone on the table, even face down, is an insult to the hostess who has painstakingly prepared the food.

If it is a restaurant you’re at, it is offensive to the other guests. Especially if your work follows you everywhere in the form of beeping text messages and incessant calls.

The Chopstick Crime

Exotic sushi morsels enjoyed with a drizzle of soy – heaven.

But do you rub your chopsticks together before tucking in?

If you’re guilty then you might be tacitly conveying the message, “I don’t trust your intentions” to the host.

Etiquette dictates that you accept the chopsticks in good faith and assume that all splinters have been removed in preparation for your meal.

The Curious Case of Double Dipping

Again, an innocent mistake that most people make. Dining faux pas rampant in the United States, double dipping is unhygienic and crass.

Refrain from scooping up delicious guacamole or even healthy hummus a second time with the same chip if you have company for the meal and are sharing a bowl.

The Early Finish

There are American and European variants of the rule and that complicates things.

But based on where you’re eating, you should avoid the 4:20 arrangement of your silverware (fork tines up or down) if you wish to continue your meal and are just taking a conversation break.

The 4:20 is an accepted signal that you are done with the food and the waiter can clear the table.

Can make for pretty awkward silences!

Leave
a comment

X